The Political Economy of Slums: Theory and Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa

Fox. S. 2014. ‘The Political Economy of Slums: Theory and Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa.’ World Development (54), February 2014, Pages 191–203.

Over 800 million people in Africa, Asia, and Latin America live in slums. Why? This paper argues that slums are a result of “disjointed modernization” and show that 70% of cross-country variation in slum incidence is explained by demographic, economic, and institutional factors. It traces the origins of disjointed modernization in sub-Saharan Africa back to the colonial period and shows that colonial era investments and institutions are reflected in contemporary variation in slum incidence. The paper argues that status quo interests and the rise of an anti-urbanization bias in development discourse have inhibited investment and reform in the postcolonial era.

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Details

Publication Type Journal article
Publisher World Development/Science Direct
Year 2013
Author(s) Sean Fox
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One Response to “The Political Economy of Slums: Theory and Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa”

  1. Paper: The Political Economy of Slums: Theory a...

    […] This paper challenges the rise of an anti-urbanization bias in development discourse which has though to have inhibited investment and reform in the postcolonial era.  […]

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