• Diamond mining, urbanisation and social transformation in Sierra Leone

    This contribution critically explores changing relationships between diamond mining and patterns of urbanisation in Sierra Leone. In providing an historical overview of mining expansion and contraction, the paper highlights the significant impacts that mining has had on the rural urban continuum, and how this has shaped political, economic and social change in diamondiferous regions. Focusing on Kono District, the effects of diamond mining on populations are evaluated before, during and after the civil war…

  • Angola’s planned and unplanned urban growth: diamond mining towns in the Lunda Provinces

    Mining towns in Angola have followed a different growth trajectory from urban agglomerations elsewhere on the continent. Colonial mining cities were treated as regional strategic locations mainly under the direction of mining companies, with an orientation towards natural and human resources management and planned urbanisation. As Angola became engulfed in civil war after independence in 1975, urban planning and control fell into disarray, which led to rapid and unplanned urban growth as rural populations fled the insecurity of the countryside. In the provinces of…

  • Exploring the connections: mining and urbanisation in Ghana

    Studies of mining and urbanisation have been primarily conducted independently of one another, with limited consideration of the inter-linkages between the two. This analysis seeks to fill this gap by exploring the links between mining and urbanisation in a Ghanaian context. Ghana is an interesting case as it is both endowed with significant mineral wealth and is highly urbanised, with a long history of urban settlement compared to most of sub-Saharan Africa. Mining and…

  • Mining, welfare and urbanisation: the wavering urban character of Zambia’s Copperbelt

    This article focuses on the character of life and social welfare services in the mining towns of what was once the most urbanised country in central Africa. The services provided by mining companies varied over the years: from minimal at the time of the industry’s establishment in the 1920s; to a period of largesse between the 1950s and the late 1970s; and then a slow decline following the slide in world copper prices. The withdrawal of the mines from welfare provision from the mid-1990s to the present has radically altered not only people’s well-being, but…

  • The power of mining: the fall of gold and rise of Johannesburg.

    The City of Johannesburg has developed through the entire life-cycle of the mining industry. In its early years, its development was tied to the varying, but generally upward, fortunes of the mining industry. During this time, gold mining in Johannesburg, and along the Witwatersrand, propelled the growth of South Africa’s national economy into a phase of self-sustained development, and created an integrated labour market across southern Africa. It also played a key role in shaping the racial oligarchy that dominated South Africa until the fall of apartheid in the 1990s. However, gold was eventually to decline, first in the areas around Johannesburg, and then elsewhere. The growth of Johannesburg…

  • Vulnerability of Poor Urban Coastal Communities to Flooding in Lagos, Nigeria

    This paper considers the risks from and vulnerabilities to flooding in four urban poor communities close to the coast in Lagos, Nigeria. Drawing on interviews with inhabitants and key informants and also on group discussions, it documents the scale and frequency of flooding in these settlements and the impacts, as well as the individual, household and community responses. It also considers the factors that have contributed to increasing flood risks in Lagos, including the uncontrolled expansion of the built-up area, the lack of infrastructure and the failure not only to expand stormwater drainage but also…

  • Rental Value Around Hvotl Facilities In Residential Neighborhoods Of Metropolitan Lagos, Nigeria

    There has been a constant debate that High Voltage Overhead Transmission Lines (HVOTLs) facilitate residential property values diminution. This study therefore tries to capture the pattern of residential property rental values around HVOTLs using a rent comparison basis within Lagos metropolis. Questionnaires were distributed to Estate Surveyors and Valuers, residents within 200m to power lines in Surulere and Alimosho areas of Lagos coupled with an indepth interview with the Managers and field officers of the Akangba and Alimosho PHCN…

  • Assessing the Effects of Urban Planning On Residential Property Values in Agege, Lagos

    In urban centres the essence of land use planning is to ensure that urban activities are organised and developed in physical space with due consideration for protection of public interest which include health, safety, convenience, efficiency, energy conservation, environmental quality, social equity, social choice and amenity. With this background, the study examined the effects of land use planning on residential property values using a comparison of two neighbourhoods in Agege Local Government Council Area of…

  • Packaging Township Development Projects

    This module will examine how the inputs for successful township development projects can be mobilised and managed through the course of a project. Any physical intervention project – be it the establishment of a node, an activity spine or improving an open space system – needs four inputs to be mobilised and applied: 1. Land, 2. Capital, 3. Human resources and skills and 4. Statutory approvals and authorisations. To secure these inputs, a fifth condition is required: leadership. Someone needs to drive the complex…

  • The Case of Nairobi, Kenya

    Urbanisation in Kenya has a long history with urban agglomeration in the form of trading centres being found along the Kenyan coast as early as the 9th Century AD (Obudho 1988: 3) . However, the growth of many urban centres can be traced to the pre-independence period when they were used as centres of administrative and political control by the colonial authorities (UNCHS 1985). The proportion of Kenyans living in urban centres increased from 5.1 percent in 1948 to 15.1 percent in 1979, to 18.0 percent in 1989 and 34.8 per cent in 2000. There are…